Thursday, December 10, 2009

Clayton State University's Hollowell Publishes 'The Forgotten Room': Legislation Introduced to Protect Children from Misuse of Seclusion

/PRNewswire/ -- Dr. Mary Hollowell, an associate professor of Teacher Education at Clayton State University, recently published "The Forgotten Room," a book covering an ethnographic case study of a public alternative school which highlights solitary confinement.

"I've tried to write the kind of education book that I've always liked to read -- a chronology of a school year from start to finish that sucks you in, sweeps you along, and spits you out," explains Hollowell. "'The Forgotten Room' is a unique and somber story of students on parole, and it reveals what happens to them and their hardworking teachers when they are put in crumbling school buildings and overcrowded conditions. It's dark and gritty. I saw students threaten and assault teachers. We had lockdowns, SWAT team visits, gang fighting, drug dealing, and students on rampages, but we also had oases of peace in the classrooms of exemplary teachers."

During her study of this school she discovered the "forgotten room" used for solitary confinement. She noted and photographed the graffiti written in blood covering the walls of this room.

"I have been an advocate against 'school seclusion,' as it is called, ever since. Seclusion rooms are allowed in Georgia public schools provided they are big enough for children to lie down, have good visibility, and have locks that spring open in case of an emergency such as a fire. The small, dark solitary confinement cells that I have seen, though, are double-bolted on the outside and do not meet these criteria," Hollowell expresses. "This week I learned that U.S. Reps. George Miller (D-CA) and Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) will introduce new legislation to protect all children in schools from misuse of restraint and seclusion. If my book 'The Forgotten Room' can play any part in the process, I will be satisfied."

For her book Hollowell used her own black and white images to accompany the text. Each chapter opens with a provocative photo of the deteriorating facility or neighborhood. Her work is featured as the cover image as well.

The 2009 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award winner from the American Library Association for lifetime contributions to children's literature, Ashley Bryan, wrote the foreword for Hollowell's book.

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Friday, December 4, 2009

Give the Gift of Southern History this Holiday: West Georgia Novelist Explores the History of Racial Tensions in Forsyth County in 'Soul Purpose'

Give the Gift of Southern History this Holiday Season: West Georgia Novelist Explores the History of Racial Tensions in Forsyth County in 'Soul Purpose'

/PRNewswire/ -- Soul Purpose, a historical fiction novel written by Dr. Kele Sewell, tells the story of the fiery racial discrimination of the 20th century in Forsyth County. The author weaves two stories throughout the book: life in Forsyth County during 1912, when all black residents were burned out of the city following the death of a white girl; and from 1965 to present day, showing a county that did not have a single black resident until years after civil rights leaders marched through, protesting the hatred that dominated for so long.

The narrative set in the early part of the century gives life to the story told in history books of Mae Crowe, a young white girl who was raped and murdered. Her father, the local district attorney, sentenced two black men to a public hanging for the crime. Race riots broke out, and eventually all black residents were forced to leave the county to sell their homes for a fraction of their value or they were burned down by the Klan.

The modern-day part of Soul Purpose focuses on the transformation of Kelly, a young white boy raised in Forsyth County whose adult influences were his father, who was an alcoholic and racist; his grandfather, a preacher who taught hate at home and from the pulpit; and his mother, who taught the importance of viewing individuals as equals--no matter the color of their skin. Kelly's life could have gone toward ignorance and hatred or toward understanding. Thanks to his mother's influence, he befriended a black psychiatrist and his son. Over time and through this friendship, Kelly is able to break the cycle of racism that plagued his family's history.

"I was raised in Forsyth County and my experience was very similar to that of Kelly, the lead character of the present day storyline," said Sewell. "I was racist because I didn't know any better. Racism was all around me, at church and at home. In my adult life I've learned how wrong I was. I struggled for years with the blind discrimination of my youth and came to the conclusion that I had to write this story to bring to light the pain that ignorance has and can cause."

Sewell's ground-breaking novel artfully blends fact and fiction to give the reader a greater understanding of racism spanning the last century. Its message is a significant, social commentary about the necessity of healing deep racial wounds, both real and imagined, to bring about change.

In honor of Hosea Williams' efforts to integrate Forsyth County in the 1980's, Sewell will donate a percentage of proceeds from Soul Purpose to the non-profit Hosea Williams Feed the Hungry organization.

Soul Purpose is available online at www.Amazon.com and www.BarnesandNoble.com and in Georgia retail outlets including Borders in Douglasville and Humpus Bumpus books in Forsyth County.

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Thursday, November 12, 2009

Call for entries announced for SPJ’s annual Sigma Delta Chi Awards in journalism

The Society of Professional Journalists is pleased to announce it is accepting entries for the Sigma Delta Chi Awards, a contest that recognizes the best in the journalism profession. The SDX Awards honor excellence in print, radio, television, newsletters, photography, online and research. The awards program dates back to 1932 when the Society first honored six individuals for contributions to journalism.

NEW THIS YEAR: Entrants can submit their work online. The new format allows journalists to enter their work easily and efficiently.

To be eligible for SDX Awards, work must have been published or broadcast during the 2009 calendar year. SPJ members may enter the SDX Awards for $60. The non-member fee is $100. Winners will be honored at the 2010 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference in Las Vegas Oct. 3-6. Contest rules and categories can be found here.

The entry deadline is Feb. 12, 2010. Visit the SPJ Awards site for more information and to enter.

Direct questions to Awards Coordinator Lauren Rochester at (317) 927-8000 ext. 210 or awards@spj.org.Founded in 1909 as Sigma Delta Chi, SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to a well-informed citizenry; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and protects First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. For more information about SPJ, please visit www.spj.org.
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Saturday, November 7, 2009

Teen Tackles Unusual "Job" - Writes Book Featuring Vanishing Towns of Rural Georgia

While other teens hope for a high school job bagging groceries or working in a local retail outlet, Andy Kite has done something unusual. He spent his entire summer traveling to small towns in rural Georgia, interviewing long-time residents, and photographing each town's most interesting sites. Each trip began with a visit to the local public library, and research continued after returning home. This "job" produced the book, Vanishing Towns of Rural Georgia (2009 Andy Kite) which is out today.

Vanishing Towns of Rural Georgia is a history and photography book. It is aimed at people of any age who enjoy small town Americana. Carefully written, photographed, edited, and entirely produced by this 16 year-old, the book highlights 14 "dying" Georgia towns including Auroria, Boneville, Buckhead, Chauncey, Cohutta, Culloden, DeSoto, Elko, Kite, Newton, Norristown, Omaha, Penfield, and Sharon. The book contains detailed information, historic anecdotes, and photographs of what these places are like today. It portrays the author's deep love of and curiosity about the rural South.

Andy Kite is an eleventh grade student at Etowah High School in Cherokee County, Georgia. He also attends Kennesaw State University in the Joint Enrollment Honors Program. Andy is available for interviews and may be contacted at the numbers above.

Books are available for individual or bulk purchase from:

Indigo Publishing Group, LLC
Henry S. Beers, Publisher
435 Second Street, Suite 320
Macon GA 31201
866-311-9578
http://www.indigopublishing.com
Vanishing Towns of Rural Georgia
ISBN: (13 digit) 978-1-934144-64-0
(10 digit) 1-934144-64-9
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Monday, October 5, 2009

The Science of The Lost Symbol

Like Dan Brown's other books that creatively use scientific ideas within the storyline, in the end "The Lost Symbol" is a work of fiction, and so is most of the science it contains.

Dan Brown's latest book, "The Lost Symbol," is woven with a maze of secretive plots, conspiracies, symbols and codes. "Symbol" is another thriller by Brown that draws inspiration from a mixture of science and mysticism.

One of the main characters is a researcher at the Smithsonian Institution's vast support center, a location that is off-limits to the public. The real science in "Symbol" takes a turn toward fiction when Brown suggests that noetics -- a metaphysical discipline that attempts to examine the connection between human and supernatural intelligence -- will revolutionize human knowledge. The "research" is based on the work of institutions that were formed in the late 1970s, during the height of New Age mysticism.

The researcher becomes interested in noetics when her brother mentions that many ancient texts contain ideas that could be considered similar to the discoveries of modern science. Modern ideas such as quantum entanglement, string theory and multiple universes are presented as parallel to content mentioned in the writings of early philosophers. The book repeatedly tries to connect actual science with mysticism, even weaving in Albert Einstein's thoughts on cosmological religion.

The fictional Smithsonian lab that Brown creates is a sleek and full of modern, cutting-edge technology. Hydrogen fuel cells power the vast dark space of the archive, and data is stored via holographic servers.

Most of these advances are at least plausible. Holographic data storage is not yet financially feasible for conventional computer markets, though it has been produced commercially for limited applications. Hydrogen fuel cells exist and can store power-making components longer than chemical batteries can, but not for the hundreds of years suggested by the book. "Symbol" cites a few real scientific treasures housed by the Smithsonian, such as a Mars rock meteorite, a 40 foot giant squid, and some of Charles Darwin's original collections.

But like Brown's other books, while creative in their use of science and scientific ideas, "Symbol" is, in the end, a work of fiction, and so is most of the science it contains.

By Martha Heil
Inside Science News Service
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Sunday, October 4, 2009

Win $1000 in Short Story Writing Contest: "Rain Stories"

BookRix, sponsor of the Georgia Writers Association Writers conference announces a Short Story Writing Contest. The contest deadline is October 15th 2009.

Anyone registered at BookRix.com website can join the contest.

Authors and readers can enter the competition for free and win cash money. Enter a book about rain that you have already written and published or write a new rain story.

Prizes for authors:

First Prize: $1000
Second Prize: $500
Third Prize: $300

Prizes for readers:

10 Amazon vouchers each worth $20 will be raffled for free among all readers taking part in the voting process.
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Monday, September 21, 2009

New Fiction Portrays Gripping Life Story

If you could reinvent your life, how would you do it? In her new book releasing this month, “What About the Children?” Georgia author Alice Heath-Gladden explores a fictionalized life story, uncovering wounds so deep that only she could go there.

After both parents die within a few months of each other, Alisha Copper and her three brothers are summarily separated and placed in orphanages. How could these siblings, so geographically separated, ever be reunited? The story's twists and turns are mixed with tragedy after tragedy, all overcome by the unlikely advantage of the Copper Children's beginning.

Mary Ball, of Alexandria, Virginia, says, “This poignant and deeply moving story of orphans spoke to me. Their separation at an early age, and Alisha's determination and pursuit of music, paralleled with her brothers' struggles and triumphs will stay with you long after you've finished their story. Its authenticity will touch your heart as it takes you into the lives of the amazing people who enter their lives to nurture and to heal. I loved this book.”

Published by Tate Publishing and Enterprises, the book is available at any bookstore nationwide or can be ordered through the publisher at www.tatepublishing.com/bookstore or by visiting barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com or target.com. This is also an eLIVE title, meaning each copy contains a code redeemable for a free audio version from TatePublishing.com. eLIVE – Listen, Imagine, View, and Experience!

Heath-Gladden worked for many years in the military housing industry and currently resides in Newnan, Georgia.

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Sunday, September 20, 2009

Clayton State Visiting Writers Reading Series for Fall 2009 Semester

The Clayton State University Department of English’s popular Visiting Writers Reading Series features three authors reading their works this semester.

The series opened last week with Dr. Brigitte Byrd, Clayton State assistant professor of English, reading from her just-published third book of poems, “Song of a Living Room.” (Ahsahta Press).

“In writing `Song of a Living Room,’ my field of inquiry was a couple who step into a relationship as one steps into a magic circle -- more accurately in their case, they step into a Celtic knot -- which opens an imaginary world to them, a world they create, a world that also creates them, a world that forces them to create each other, a world that blurs time and space, a world in which they escape reality, a world in which they may lose themselves.,” explains Byrd. “Because prose poetry is a form that is natural to me, a form I love, I wrote `Song of a Living Room’ as a series of prose poems revolving around these two characters.”

For more information, go to http://www.brigittebyrd.com/.

On Thursday, Oct. 8, Clayton State’s foremost mystery artist, Clayton State Theater Director Phillip DePoy, will introduce the Visiting Writers Reading Series to “The King James Conspiracy,” (St. Martin’s Press) his acclaimed new novel that’s, according to Atlanta Magazine, a dizzying mix of historical facts and figments of the author’s imagination.

Set in 17th Century England, the story centers on a group of scholars assigned by King James I to create a definitive English translation of the Bible, what has become known as the King James edition of the Bible. When one of the scholars is murdered and mutilated, DePoy leads the story into, not surprisingly, a conspiracy.

DePoy will be reading 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 200 of the Clayton State Library. For more information, go to http://www.phillipdepoy.com/

Finally, on Thursday, Nov. 19, in room 272 of the Baker Center, poet/photographer Kate Greenstreet will read from her latest work, also recently published by Ahsahta Press (http://ahsahtapress.boisestate.edu/subscription.htm), “The Last 4 Things.” For more information, go to http://www.kickingwind.com/.

A unit of the University System of Georgia, Clayton State University is an outstanding comprehensive metropolitan university located 15 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta.
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Friday, September 18, 2009

Author Alice Heath-Gladden Book Signing at Books-A-Million PTC

Heath-Gladden will be available to sign copies of her novel, "What About the Children?" at Books-A-Million, 258 City Cir., Peachtree City, 9/26/09, 2-4 p.m.

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Author Joseph Skillin Book Signing Event

9/19/09
11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Carestone at Mount Zion,
7493 Mount Zion Blvd.,
Jonesboro, GA 30236

Skillin will be available to sign copies of his book, "Confessions of a Caregiver: When Alzheimer's Comes to Your Home."

Saturday, September 5, 2009

Southern Women Writers Conference Draws Top Authors, Emerging Talents

Some of the most distinctive voices in Southern literature will gather on the world’s largest college campus, Sept. 24-26, for the 2009 Southern Women Writers Conference. Two Pulitzer Prize winners – poet Natasha Trethewey and playwright Marsha Norman – will headline the biennial celebration, which is hosted by Berry College.

The Southern Women Writers Conference is dedicated to showcasing the works of well known and emerging Southern women writers, expanding the literary canon, and developing critical and theoretical understandings of traditions and innovations in Southern women’s writing. The theme for this year’s event is “Many Souths: Remembering, Sustaining, Creating,” which invites attendees to explore the distinctive ways in which Southern women have used the written word to evoke indelible images defined by such factors as geography, gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, class, sexuality and spirituality.

Joining Trethewey and Norman on this year’s program are Natalie Daise and Connie May Fowler. Daise is one of the masterminds behind the Nickelodeon program Gullah Gullah Island, while Fowler’s novel, Before Women Had Wings, was adapted into an Emmy-Award winning film produced by Oprah Winfrey. Also on hand will be Sarah Gordon, one of the foremost experts on the life and work of Flannery O’Connor, and Melissa Fay Greene, winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award and the Lillian Smith Award for Praying for Sheetrock and a two-time finalist for the National Book Award. Other featured authors include Allison Hedge Coke, a noted poet, memoirist and anthologist of Indigenous American and European descent; Judith Ortiz Cofer; Thulani Davis, Sharyn McCrumb; and Mab Segrest.

Also featured will be emerging writers with local roots. Several Berry alumni will participate, including Joanna Grant, Berry’s first Rhodes Scholar, and Alicia Clavell, editor of a new journal, Southern Women’s Review, inspired by her past participation in the conference. The journal made its debut in July and is available for download at www.SouthernWomensReview.com. It features a variety of material including poetry, fiction, non-fiction and photography. Submissions are welcome.

“As an undergraduate at Berry, I had the opportunity to work at the very first conference and have been back almost every year since,” Clavell explained. “This is my first year as a reader at the conference, and I couldn't be more excited … or nervous.”

Registration for the full conference is $175. Student and Saturday-only registration is $90. Call 706-368-6996 or e-mail swwc@berry.edu for more information. Online registration and event details are available at www.berry.edu/swwc2009.

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Wednesday, September 2, 2009

Are you ready to be ‘Fabulous Over Forty’?

Does aging have to define and limit women in the middle of their lives? According to author Josie Slaton Terry in her new book “Fabulous Over Forty,” No!

“Getting older is the expression of our best self,” she says. With the right attitude and activity, Terry claims, women can be more powerful as the years stack up. In hope for new dreams being birthed and old ones being fulfilled, “Fabulous Over Forty” can be a middle-aged woman’s best friend. Terry’s goal is to let the 40-something female of today know that time is still on her side and that the aging process is as beautiful on the outside as the heart on the inside.

Published by Tate Publishing and Enterprises, the book is available at any bookstore nationwide or can be ordered through the publisher at www.tatepublishing.com/bookstore, or by visiting barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com or target.com. “Fabulous Over Forty” is also an eLIVE title, meaning each copy contains a code redeemable for a free audio version from TatePublishing.com. eLIVE – Listen, Imagine, View, and Experience!

Born in Woodbury, Ga., Terry has lived and worked most of her life in Atlanta. She is a business owner, graphic designer, writer, and speaker who is aging quite well. She is the organizer and founder of the Atlanta based Integrity Networking Group for Business Support. Terry’s “Fabulous Over Forty” journey has spurred her desire to age well and accomplish her goals by sending one message to women 40 and over… “It is never too late.”

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Thursday, August 20, 2009

Fourth Annual AJC Decatur Book Festival Presented by DeKalb Medical Sept 4 - 6

2009 Decatur Book Festival Set for Labor Day Weekend, September 4-6

The Fourth Annual Atlanta Journal-Constitution Decatur Book Festival Presented By DeKalb Medical (DBF) will be held on Labor Day Weekend (September 4-6) 2009, DBF Executive Director Daren Wang recently announced.

“We’re very excited about this year’s event,” Wang said. “With the continued support of the AJC, DeKalb Medical, the Georgia Center for the Book, and other sponsors, DBF 2009 is sure to be the can’t-miss community event of the summer.”

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Decatur Book Festival Presented by DeKalb Medical is an annual, free book festival held in Decatur, Georgia at venues located in and around the downtown square. Conceived in 2005 and launched in 2006, the festival brings more than 250 authors to Decatur for the holiday weekend. The authors — who include Pulitzer Prize winning and best-selling fiction and nonfiction writers — give readings and participate in panel discussions.

The 2008 event drew over 75,000 people to Decatur for three days of literature, music, food, and fun.
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Phillip DePoy Talks Conspiracy at Decatur Book Festival

He’s just written a highly-acclaimed novel speculating on a conspiracy in conjunction with the compilation of the King James Bible, so it should come as no surprise that Clayton State Theater Director Phillip DePoy is “booked” at the upcoming Decatur Book Festival on a panel about conspiracy theories.

The date is Saturday, Sept. 5 from 11:15 a.m. to noon. As part of the largest independent book festival in the country, DePoy will be appearing at the Old Courthouse Stage with fellow mystery authors Mitchell Graham and Robert Greer to discuss “conspiracy theories.”

While DePoy may not be discussing the Single Bullet Theory or whether or not a bunch of astronauts landed on the moon 30 years ago (Actually, the three authors will be sharing excerpts from their recent novels and answering questions.), he certainly knows about conspiracy. His newest book, “The King James Conspiracy” (St. Martin’s Press, $25.95) is, according to Atlanta Magazine, a dizzying mix of historical facts and figments of the author’s imagination.

Set in 17th Century England, the story centers on a group of scholars assigned by King James I to create a definitive English translation of the Bible, what has become known as the King James edition of the Bible. When one of the scholars is murdered and mutilated, DePoy leads the story into a, that’s right, conspiracy.

A folklorist, playwright, composer, actor, producer, musician as well as a novelist and director of the Clayton State Theater, DePoy should also be one of the highlights of this year’s Decatur Book Festival.

For more information, go to http://www.decaturbookfestival.com/2009/authors/author-detail.php?PresenterID=60.

A unit of the University System of Georgia, Clayton State University is an outstanding comprehensive metropolitan university located 15 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta.
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Wednesday, August 19, 2009

ETreasures Publishing for Sale

ETreasures Publishing, a five-year-old established print-on-demand book publishing company, is currently for sale, due to the failing health of the owner and founder, Vickie Kennedy.

Kennedy is looking for someone trustworthy to purchase the company and website, which will include all contracted books. The new owner would have to establish new accounts with re-sellers, which she will also help obtain. The asking price for the contracted books and website is $3,000. Training will be extra and is negotiable. Anyone interested, please contact Vickie Kennedy at 770-683-9745 or by e-mail at v.kennedy@numail.org

Thursday, August 13, 2009

“Read a Book / Create Some Art” Deadline Extended to August 31

Calling all artists who love to read … The deadline for entries in the “Read A Book / Create Some Art” juried visual arts competition has been extended to Monday, August 31. “Read A Book / Create Some Art” is part of the second annual “Fayette on the Page” project.

“Fayette on the Page” is a “One Book, One Community” program comprising a variety of activities centered on the novel A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines. The countywide initiative is a partnership of Fayette County Public Library with the Friends of the Fayette County Public Library, Barnes & Noble of Fayetteville, Clayton State University, and Kimbo’s Frame & Design of Fayetteville.

For “Read A Book / Create Some Art,” visual artists from Fayette and surrounding counties have been invited to create works inspired by their reading of any of Ernest Gaines’s novels or short stories (not limited to A Lesson Before Dying), and enter them in a juried competition. The competition is open to all artists, whether student, professional, or amateur. Interested artists can pick up an information sheet with entry form at the Fayette County Public Library, or download a copy from the library website. Artwork may be submitted to library staff during library hours between now and Monday, August 31 at the Fayette County Public Library in Fayetteville. Works entered in the “Read A Book / Create Some Art” competition will be on public exhibit at the Fayette County Public Library for two weeks in September.

The “Fayette on the Page” reading celebration will have a grand finale on Thursday, September 10, at 6:30 p.m., when Ernest J. Gaines will “visit” the library via live two-way videoconference from his home in Point Coupee, Louisiana. Mr. Gaines will talk about “A Lesson Before Dying” and answer questions from the audience. Winners of the “Read a Book / Create Some Art” competition will be announced during this free public event.

The Fayette County Public Library is located behind the Fayette County administration complex in downtown Fayetteville, at the southwest corner of Highways #85 and #54. For additional information about “Fayette on the Page” and “Read A Book / Create Some Art,” please contact the library at 770-461-8841 or visit online at http://www.fayettecountyga.gov/public_library.
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Award-Winning Coweta Author C. E. Walz Publishes Alley Loo

Coweta Author C. E. Walz has won the Dragon Fly Publishing Best Book Award for her recently published children's book Alley Loo: A Spooky Swamp Tale. The book also has gotten a five-star review from Lori Calabrese of the Children's Book Examiner, which was published in the Amazon Customer Reviews last week. Calabrese has also conducted an interview of Walz which was published in the July 31, 2009 issue of the Children's Book Examiner. Both the review and interview are helpful in learning about Walz and her book. Additional information is available on her website www.cewalz.com.

Walz has been teaching writing and English for many years. She currently heads the middle school English Department at Woodward Academy in College Park. She lives in Newnan in the same subdivision as another award winning children's author, Kimberly Campbell. They also both belong to the Childrens Book Authors and Illustrators organization as well as the Coweta Writers Group.

Walz plans to join other Coweta authors in the book signing for local authors which will be held at the Powers Festival over the Labor Day Weekend. She will also be participating later in a yet to be announced program at The Carnegie in Newnan, which has not yet opened.

Walz (her pen name and maiden name) is married to singer/guitarist James Sennett, who is known as the Songman, who performs at local venues and will be one of the singers at Grantville Day.

- Forrest Schultz
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Sunday, August 9, 2009

"Historic Fayette County: An Illustrated History" Book Signing

Saturday, August 22, 2-4 pm,
Fayette Co. Library
Sunday, August 23, 2-4 pm,
Fayette Co. Historical Society

Join author, Carolyn Cary and cover artist, Vicki Turner at a book signing for Fayette's beautiful new history book. The books will be on sale at the special introductory price of $25. Refreshments will be served.

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Georgia Teacher to Appear on National Radio

Interesting subjects, bright young minds: many say teaching is one of the most rewarding careers. Though the profession reaps giant rewards, it’s also renowned for a petite paycheck. Hoschton, Georgia educator Danny Kofke has discovered how to fulfill his passion for teaching and still make ends meet, and he shares the wealth in his book, “How to Survive (and Perhaps Thrive) on a Teacher’s Salary.”

A prolific public speaker, Kofke will be discussing his book on the nationally syndicated Ron Reagan Show this Monday evening. The radio show is affiliated with Air America Media and is hosted by decorated media contributor and correspondent Ron Reagan. Kofke will cover his book’s easy-to-use tips that equip readers to not only survive, but live happily within their means, multiply funds and even invest in the future.

“Although this book was written with teachers in mind, I believe the practices taught can benefit anyone, from firefighters and policemen, to CEOs and business owners,” Kofke writes. “In this book, I will show you how my wife and I were able to visit ten foreign countries, pay-off a brand new car in two years, and even have one of us stay home for the first year of my daughter’s life—all on a teacher’s salary!”

Published by Tate Publishing and Enterprises, the book is available at any bookstore nationwide or can be ordered through the publisher at www.tatepublishing.com/bookstore or by visiting barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com or target.com. An audio version also is available from the publisher.

Kofke is currently a special education teacher. He also has taught preschool, kindergarten, first grade and second grade classes. He and his wife, Tracy, have two children.

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Monday, June 29, 2009

Christian Writers to Meet

Christian Writers United (CWU) will have their next meeting on Tuesday, July 7, 2009, at Coweta Community Church located on the 34 by-pass. The meeting will run from 7 – 9 p.m.

All Christian writers are invited regardless of genre choice. According to co-founder Swanee Ballman, “We recently had an author attend CWU who has written two Christian westerns. This is a genre which is not often seen in the Christian community. Everyone is excited about it.”

“Additionally,” states co-founder Linda Jennings, “our members and attendees don’t just write books and scripts, they also write magazine articles. Several have begun entering writing contests, and they are having a ball doing it.”

Connie Singleton recently placed second in the Newnan-Coweta Magazine’s 2009 writer’s competition. Her article, “Magic” was published on the magazine’s website.

Edwina Cowgill has made the first cut in the “Winning Writers Tom Howard Short Story Contest.” She has also been published in several magazines using different genres.

“The main goal of CWU is to encourage those who already write and those who desire to write – to write,” states Jennings. “Considering everybody’s hectic daily schedules, writers need continual encouragement to write. We also need help in the areas of publishing and marketing and CWU members can provide assistance in both areas.”

Presently, CWU members are working on a book of short stories written by CWU members. It will be published in the late fall.

Thursday, June 4, 2009

Eugenia Price Exhibit to Open at St. Simons Island Lighthouse

The Coastal Georgia Historical Society celebrates the life of Eugenia Price with a new exhibit opening in the St. Simons Lighthouse Keepers Dwelling on Saturday, June 13. Museum-goers will have a chance to explore Price’s life behind her acclaimed novels, visualize her research techniques and draw connections between the characters she created and their basis in the historical record.

Price’s desk, set with manuscripts, photographs, letters, and typewriter are central to the exhibit along with awards, photographs, and personal memorabilia including a hand made Braves tomahawk sent her by a reader.

Whether you are a longtime reader or a regular museum visitor, you will find new angles to explore the history of the Golden Isles and the writing of one of the area’s most popular and well-loved authors.

The exhibit will open with a weekend celebration on Saturday, June 13 and continue throughout the summer in connection with a series of speakers, book discussions, and other activities related to Eugenia Price and her career.

Opening Events:

Book Signing June 13
On Saturday, June 13 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Mary Bray Wheeler will sign copies of Eugenia Price: A Guide to the People and Places of Her Beloved South. This long-time friend and researcher for Price, has combined extensive journeys through the South with in-depth knowledge of Price’s literary people and places. Wheeler has an extensive publishing career and before retiring served as a researcher, writer and editor, as well as vice president of Providence House Publishers. She holds a degree in American Studies from Mercer University and now resides in Nashville, Tennessee.

Renee Pearman Presentation June 14
Then on Sunday, June 14 at 3 p.m., Renee Pearman will present Eugenia Price: One Author’s Life. Born in 1916 in Charleston, West Virginia, Eugenia Price credits her mother with nurturing her love of writing, music, and history. Pearman will discuss Price’s early career as a writer for NBC through her development of her own company, Eugenia Price Productions and the unlikely events that lead her to St. Simons Island and a future career as a historical fiction writer. Ms. Pearman is publications coordinator and adjunct instructor at Macon State College.

The book signing and presentation are held at the A. W. Jones Heritage Center at no charge.to the public and museum admission fees of $6.00 apply to tour the exhibit. CGHS members may visit the exhibit at no charge.
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Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Lauretta Hannon, Author of Southern Memoir “The Cracker Queen,” to Appear at Fayette County Public Library June 11

The Fayette County Public Library is pleased to present Georgia author and National Public Radio (NPR) commentator Lauretta Hannon on Thursday, June 11 at 7:00 p.m. to read from and talk about her new memoir of growing up Southern, “The Cracker Queen: A Memoir of a Jagged, Joyful Life.” Copies of the book will be available for sale at the event, with proceeds benefiting the Friends of the Fayette County Public Library. The program is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served, compliments of the Friends of the Fayette County Public Library.

What is a Cracker Queen? A Cracker Queen is a strong, authentic Southern woman who holds her head up high, has a raucous sense of humor, and raises Cain when a line is crossed. She knows loss and hurt first-hand; these things have made her beautiful, resourceful and, above all, real.

In “The Cracker Queen,” Lauretta Hannon tells of her tumultuous upbringing in Warner Robins and Savannah, and explains why a Cracker Queen is the “anti-Southern–belle.” Young Lauretta was handed lemons and made the sweetest, tartest lemonade she could. Her entertaining stories of Crazy Aunt Carrie, The Goat Man, her own Mama smuggling cigarettes to chain gangs, and the more unsavory parts of Savannah will make you laugh, cry, and raise a toast. In “The Cracker Queen,” Hannon proves that all Southern families may not be created equal, but they do all know a thing or two about surviving hard times.

Lauretta Hannon is a commentator on NPR’s All Things Considered,” where her stories reach 25.5 million listeners. Over the years she has contributed pieces to newspapers across the Southeast. Lauretta has also worked as the vice president of an advertising agency, a fortune teller, an independent radio producer, a cocktail waitress, a writing instructor, and a marketing consultant. Just this year, she left her day job at Atlanta Technical College in order to pursue a fulltime writing career. Hannon also offers writing workshops through her Down Home Writing School.

The Fayette County Public Library is located behind the Fayette County administrative complex in downtown Fayetteville, at the southwest corner of Highways #85 and #54. For additional information, please contact the library at 770-461-8841.

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Friday, May 22, 2009

"The King James Conspiracy" Release Party – May 26

Is “The King James Conspiracy” the second coming of "The Name of the Rose?"

Readers will have a chance to find out on Tuesday, May 26 when the Eagle Eye Book Shop, 2076 N. Decatur Rd., Decatur, holds a 6:30 p.m. release party for Clayton State Theater Director Philips DePoy's 11th novel, "The King James Conspiracy." (St. Martin’s Press, $25.95)

Since DePoy's latest work is an historical novel/murder mystery set in 17th Century England and centered on a group of scholars assigned by King James I to create a definitive English translation of the Bible, there are clearly similarities to Umberto Eco's classic 1983 historical novel/detective story, set in a northern Italian abbey in 1327. And while Eco’s novel is justly famous, there are few authors who can top DePoy for creativity.

For more information on the release party, call the Eagle Eye Book Shop’s George Scott at (404) 486-0307.

A unit of the University System of Georgia, Clayton State University is an outstanding comprehensive metropolitan university located 15 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta.
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Thursday, May 21, 2009

Fayette: Young Authors Win at Competition

Three possible up and coming authors have been recognized through the Young Georgia Authors Writing Competition.

Tyler S. Patrick, first grade, Hood Avenue Primary; Ian Fertig, second grade, Braelinn Elementary; and Laura Wu, fifth grade, Kedron Elementary all had winning entries at the Griffin RESA district level, which includes Butts, Henry, Lamar, Newton, Pike, Spalding and Thomaston-Upson counties.

The contest, sponsored by the Georgia Department of Education, is open to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. One winner is selected from each grade level. Any type of writing can be entered. Entries may be short stories, poetry, essays, journals, personal narratives, reports or any other original student writing. District winners advance to compete at the state level.

The purposes of the Young Georgia Authors Writing Competition are to encourage students to develop writing that represents their best efforts, provide a context for schools to support and celebrate the writing successes of all students, and encourage and recognize student achievement in writing throughout Georgia.
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Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Phillip DePoy, Author of New Historical Mystery Novel “The King James Conspiracy,” to Appear at Fayette County Public Library

Saturday, May 30 at 1:00 p.m.

Multi-talented Atlanta author Phillip DePoy returns to the Fayette County Public Library on Saturday, May 30 at 1:00 p.m. to read from and talk about his new novel, “The King James Conspiracy.” Copies of the book will be available for sale at the event, with proceeds benefiting the Friends of the Fayette County Public Library. The program is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served, compliments of the Friends of the Fayette County Public Library.

“The King James Conspiracy” is set in 1605 England. The story hinges on an intricate and murderous plot to suppress the creation of the King James Bible. Although the story is fictional, it features numerous real-life historical figures. New York Times bestselling author Steve Berry (“The Venetian Betrayal”) has said “‘The King James Conspiracy’ is smart, detailed, and highly entertaining. The story resonates, blending myth with reality, tragedy with triumph, and history with passion into a compelling tale. Phillip DePoy clearly knows what he’s doing.” Booklist compares the novel to Umberto Eco’s contemporary classic “The Name of the Rose,” calling “The King James Conspiracy” “a splendid mixture of history and mystery, with vibrant characters and some solid twists and turns.”

Phillip DePoy is the author of ten novels (in two critically acclaimed mystery series featuring Atlanta private eye Flap Tucker and North Georgia folklorist Fever Devilin), two published plays, and 37 theatre pieces that have seen production throughout the United States. His stage adaptation of “Easy,” the first Flap Tucker novel, received the 2003 Edgar Award for Best Play from the Mystery Writers of America. “Too Easy” was a finalist for the Private Eye Writers of America’s Shamus Award in 1999. Mr. DePoy is currently director of theatre at Clayton State University.

The Fayette County Public Library is located behind the Fayette County administrative complex in downtown Fayetteville, at the southwest corner of Highways #85 and #54. For additional information, please contact the library at 770-461-8841.
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Thursday, May 14, 2009

Christian Writers Group Working on a Book

Linda Jennings of Newnan has been working hard in forming and running a new group for Christian writers in Coweta and nearby. The members are also busy now collaborating on the production of a book which will consist of a collection of short stories they will write. They will be discussing this book at their next meeting, which will be held on Monday June 1 at 7 p.m. at the Coweta Community Church, 310 Farmers Industrial Blvd. (the 34 Bypass). There will also be time during the meeting for watching a film of an author's talk at a writers conference. Info: Linda at 770-304-0282 or email at lajennings@charter.net. The Coweta Community Church can be contacted at 770-252-1616 or ccclife@gmail.com.

- Forrest Shultz
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